2018 Judicial Election Calendar

2018 ELECTIONS CALENDAR from the Secretary of State’s website, Elections page..

JANUARY
2 – Qualifying Period Begins: First day candidates may qualify for Supreme Court Justice, Court of Appeals Justice, Chancery Court Judge, Circuit Court Judge, and County Court Judge.

MAY
10 – Campaign Finance Reporting Deadline, 5:00 p.m.: Periodic Reports due in the appropriate office for 2018 judicial candidates and political committees supporting or opposing 2018 judicial candidates.

11 – Qualifying Deadline, 5:00 p.m.: Candidates for Non-Partisan Judicial Offices, i.e., Mississippi Supreme Court Justice, Mississippi Court of Appeals Justice, Circuit, Chancery or County Court Judge.

JUNE
5 – PRIMARY ELECTION DAY for U. S. Senate and U. S. House of Representatives.

8 – Campaign Finance Reporting Deadline, 5:00 p.m.: Periodic Reports due in the appropriate office for 2018 judicial candidates and political committees supporting or opposing 2018 judicial candidates.

26 – PRIMARY RUNOFF ELECTION DAY for U. S. Senate and House of Representatives.

JULY
10 – Campaign Finance Reporting Deadline, 5:00 p.m.: Periodic Reports due in the appropriate office for 2018 judicial candidates and political committees supporting or opposing 2018 judicial candidates.

OCTOBER
10 – Campaign Finance Reporting Deadline, 5:00 p.m.: Periodic Reports due in the appropriate office for 2018 judicial candidates and political committees supporting or opposing 2018 judicial candidates.

30 – Campaign Finance Reporting Deadline, 5:00 p.m.: Pre-Election Reports due in the
appropriate office for 2018 judicial candidates, school board candidates and political
committees supporting or opposing any 2018 candidate or balloted measure.

NOVEMBER
6 – GENERAL ELECTION DAY

20 – Campaign Finance Reporting Deadline, 5:00 p.m.: Pre-Runoff Election Reports due in the appropriate office for 2018 judicial candidates.

27 – GENERAL RUNOFF ELECTION DAY

DECEMBER
17 – Meeting of the State Board of Election Commissioners to Determine Election of Judges for Supreme Court and Court of Appeals.

Joke

Three boys were bragging about their dads.

Boy #1:  My dad is so fast, he can shoot an arrow at a target and get there before the arrow does.

Boy #2: My dad is so fast, he can shoot a bullet at a target and get there before the bullet does.

Boy #3: That’s nothing. My dad works for the city and even though he gets off work at 5, he is usually home by 3!

Omit needless words

Omit needless words. Eliminate unnecessary words. They serve no purpose other than to make the document sound more legal

Unnecessary Words and Phrases
• Comes Now
• and/or
• undersigned
• hereby
• herein
• in and for
• subject
• that certain
• now,” “that,” “undersigned,” “immediately,” “heretofore entered in this case,” “be, and hereby is”–the list goes on and on. Compare the meaning of “Now, therefore, it may be and is hereby ordered that:” with “It is ordered:”
• Never, never, never use legalisms:  “Said” – the “said defendant” or the “said statutes”, “Same,” • “Such”, or “Hereinafter”

Legal Writing Suggestions

Follow the rules.  Read the Mississippi Rules of Appellate Procedure before you file a notice of appeal. Read MRAP 28 before your start to write your brief.

Please follow the rules on formatting. The rules are specific on margins, line spacing, font size, cover color, page limits, etc. Do not try to “get around” page limits by cheating the margins “just a little bit.” Please don’t use double underline or all caps. Be careful with emphasis (such as italics, underlining, and bold).

Legal Writing Suggestions

Carefully choose citations. The judge must decide which cases to read. Help with this decision. Tell the judge exactly which cases to read. The judge is not going to read seventy-five cases, and you should not expect him to.

If the law is “well settled,” use the version that either squarely meets the facts of your case, was written by the Supreme Court, or was most recent. You do not have to go back to Brown v. Credit Card Center on every summary judgment appeal.

Do not worry about not including “enough” citations. No points are awarded to the party who cites the most cases. The question to ask is whether this case adds something substantive to the brief.